“I’m embarrassed to say just how much I enjoyed it!”

That’s what my 16 year old daughter had to say after watching an advance screening of Dora and the Lost City of Gold.

I have to admit, as a full grown adult, I enjoyed it too.

Let’s keep things in perspective though – it’s not what I would call a “great” movie. But it is a fun one.

Filmed in Australia, the live action Dora the Explorer movie features a teenage version Dora, played by Isabel Moner.

I can’t imagine that anyone could play teen Dora better than Moner, whose previous Dora experience included voicing Kate in Dora and Friends: Into the City!

The movie starts with Dora as a six year old (Madelyn Miranda). During the first few minutes of the movie, the two teen girls I took with me were thinking they had made a mistake agreeing to come with me.

But before long, there’s a 10 year time jump, and Dora takes a leap from jungle homeschooling to attending a big city high school.

The change of environment comes with all the cringeworthy scenes and perpetuation of social stereotypes you would expect.

The movie is not “educational”, but does use those stereotypes to set up a simple moral lesson as Dora returns to the jungle with her friends and the adventure truly begins.

What age is Dora and the Lost City of Gold intended for?

I would say that it’s not for little kids, but is geared more toward tweens.

The movie is long, nearly two hours. Easily two hours when you add in previews. Much of the movie will be over the heads of small children and they are likely to get bored.

There are also parts of the movie that small children may find frightening. Small spoiler here – while no one dies in the movie, there are times when it looks like someone may have died, only to be okay later.

Teens and adults that aren’t too picky about their entertainment and aren’t embarrassed to be at a movie based on Dora the Explorer will enjoy it as well as the tweens they take for cover.

Why is Dora and the Lost City of Gold rated PG?

There are some scenes that might scare small children, including: kidnapping; Dora and friends having to run while arrows are being shot at them; one character being completely submerged in quicksand; falls into pits; and similar violence. There’s no blood or gore.

There’s also some crude humor, primarily fart jokes.

The only sexuality in the movie is a hint at teen romance, a light kiss, and Dora mentioning mating rituals.

Overall Impression

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is light and enjoyable fare.

Be sure to stay for the fun dance number that begins when the credits start rolling.

Have you seen Dora and the Lost City of Gold? Be sure to leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

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  • Reviewed August 3, 2019, at Regal Avenues 4DX & RPX, Jacksonville, FL.